Couteaux Chef Gyuto

Gyuto Definition

A Japanese chef’s knife is known as a Gyuto (牛刀 ぎ ゅ う と う) GYUTO ), which literally means “beef knife”. Its blade resembles a flatter version of the French chef’s knife. Japanese cutlery is known for precision due to its sharp angled blade geometry and the hardness of the steel used, often exceeding 60 HRC on the Rockwell scale. A typical Western Chef’s knife can be sharpened to an edge angle of 20-22°, while a Japanese Gyuto generally has a sharper edge angle of 15-18°, which requires a harder and more brittle steel than industrial steel. Another softer steel is often added to the hard steel (Ni-Mai or San-Mai structure). In recent years the Japanese Gyuto has gained popularity among Western leaders.

 

Couteaux Chef Gyuto

Chef Gyuto knives

The blade of the chef’s knife is typically made of carbon steel. Chef’s knives are simple iron and carbon alloys without exotic additions such as chromium or vanadium. Carbon steel blades are both easier to sharpen than ordinary stainless steel and generally wear less quickly. They are, however, more vulnerable to oxidation and staining. Some professional cooks swear by carbon steel knives because of their precision. Over time, a carbon steel knife normally develops a dark patina, and can corrode if the blade is not cleaned and lubricated regularly after use. Some chefs leave their carbon steel knives “at rest” for a day after use to restore the oxidation patina, which prevents the transfer of metallic tastes to certain foods. While some cooks prefer and use carbon steel knives (particularly in Asia and the Middle East), others find carbon steel too maintenance intensive in a kitchen environment.